Mar 13, 2013

Birds- Willow Ptarmigan, State bird of Alaska



Willow Ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) is state bird of Alaska. Also known as Willow Grouse, it is a type of grouse. As you see it is ground-dwelling bird and it is a herbivore. Though chicks eat some insects. I saw them all around near Savage River area of Denali National Park, Alaska. Spring is the nesting season. In summer they have a brown plumage with white underparts and in winter they change to white with black tail.  Info from wiki- The scientific name lagopus means 'hare footed' because the bird has feathered feet to survive in cold. Cool huh?
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This post is linked to Wild Bird Wednesday and Nature Notes.

Related Articles-
Alaska Attractions
National Parks of USA
More on birds

If you want pictures please ask me :)
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Scrapbook- A Travel Blog by Kusum Sanu is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

41 comments:

  1. Great photo of a beautiful bird.

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  2. Cool! I have never seen a grouse before!

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    1. Well, now you have seen one, though a photo! :) Thanks!

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  3. Very nice photograph and really interesting information!

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  4. Very pretty bird and a great photo! Cool sighting!

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  5. Quite an interesting bird! Lovely shot.

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  6. I was not aware of Alaska's state bird.. Now I know!
    One of my sons did a report on Alaska for early grade school, and taught us that the Forget-me-not is their state flower. That's been filed in my brain ever since.
    Little by little, I'm getting to know more about Alaska.. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thank you Amanda. Glad my blog is useful to people!

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  7. A charming Alaskan bird. In the US they not only have a State Bird but also a State Insect, State Plant & State Animal. Alas In India we only have State Politicians !

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    1. yes, the bird is very charming. In India, we still haven't have states declared properly. Many want their own states yet, and so may be later we can have state birds, animals declared!

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    2. Hopefully one day during our life time this may happen !

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    3. Hopefully, until then let us enjoy national animal and bird!

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  8. Great capture!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada,.

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  9. Looks pretty. Nice capture!

    http://rajniranjandas.blogspot.in/2013/03/river-narmada.html

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  10. Great coloration for blending in and great photo Kusum.. that park is supposed to be just amazing. Thank you for linking into Nature Notes...Michelle

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  11. She is a little beauty. Love the color and shape. :)

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  12. That is very cool that they have feathered feet -- they need them, living on the ground in that climate. Wow. She's a beautiful bird.

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    1. Thanks Sallie! Nature has its protection for all its creatures.

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  13. Clear capture , Love the white color around the eye .

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    1. Thanks Dheeraj. Yes, the white ring around the eye is unique!

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  14. Beautiful bird, thanks for the information also.

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  15. It is such a pleasure to visit your blog to see and read things one has not learnt this far! Thanks Kusum:)

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    1. Thank you Bhatia Ji. Glad to read your kind words!

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  16. Thats a very nice bird - I can remember seeing a few similar birds flying away from me in the higher parts of Scotland!

    I think most of the Kestrels around the world are variations on a theme!

    Cheers and thanks for linking to WBW

    Stewart M - Melbourne

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    1. You are right, northern Scotland might have similar ones. Thanks!

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  17. They change colour? That's amazing!
    I have to say thank you for sharing this. I learnt a little something, today. :)

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    1. Yep, it seems they change color to white, may be camouflage themselves in the snow to escape getting hunted by predators. Thanks for visiting and gland you find it useful :)

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